Thank you to all

for your support throughout this unbelievable summer.  We’ve cleared out of the Hamilton Murray theater, but we’ll be back next year for another PST!  See you then.

Time Stands Still has 5 performances remaining this weekend!  See the production critics are describing as “a theater experience that audiences want to talk about” (Town Topics).

The cast of How Thumbelina Found Her Wings entertained customers at Thomas Sweet on Saturday with a surprise performance!

Time Stands Still: The Process

Cast members Evan Thompson (who just played Richard Hannay in PST’s The 39 Steps) and Sarah Paton (who stage managed the production) reflect on the differences between the rehearsal processes for spy spoofery and realistic drama.

Now that our second Sunday matinee has closed, PST’s run of The 39 Steps has finally reached its conclusion! We’re still going strong though, and this weekend we begin performances of our final show Time Stands Still. Although we only just started rehearsing the show in the Hamilton-Murray Theater, we’ve been working on this production since the opening night of The 39 Steps!

Because we worked on the two plays simultaneously, the many differences between them were thrown into sharp relief. The 39 Steps is a ludicrous, adrenaline-pumping romp through Hitchcock references and physical theater. The actors play hundreds of different characters, and the production winks at the audience as it tries to represent something as elaborate as a bustling train station with nothing more than three people and a couple of trunks. The show is never meant to be completely believable – in fact, it’s something of an exercise in finding just how far you can push the audience’s suspension of disbelief.

Time Stands Still presents an entirely different challenge. The drama of the play is best realized by depicting its characters and their experiences as if they were real, living people. As a result, the rehearsal process for Time Stands Still focused more on making each moment believable. Whereas rehearsals for The 39 Steps involved working out complex blocking and quick costume changes, those for Time Stands Still required us to delve deep into the characters’ motivations for their actions and words.

While the action of Time Stands Still takes place exclusively in one apartment, the story takes on a variety of issues. The ethics of war-zone photography, truth in art, and marriage and parenthood all come together to make the story and characters of the play come to life. Working on the play has required us to dig deeper into what we – and the characters we portray – feel about these issues. Ultimately, where The 39 Steps gave us an opportunity to test our physical limits, Time Stands Still has given us a chance to discover more about how we think and feel as human beings.


It is far more than high-speed, side-splitting fun through spyville, it is theater at its most expressive.

You’ve heard the expression “breaking the fourth wall?” Well, the actors in Princeton Summer Theatre’s production of The 39 Steps smash the wall into pieces and stomp on them.

With minimal set and only four actors playing all — I lost count at 130 — parts here, The 39 Steps becomes a tour de force that revels in the magic of theater and the amazing, inventive, ridiculously implausible act of creating something out of only the performers’ creative imagination and the audience’s willing suspension of disbelief.

Credit to director/choreographer Jeff Kuperman for this glorious trailer!!  One more chance to see The 39 Steps this weekend, tomorrow at 2pm (tonight is already sold out).  Hurry on over!

Take a look at PST’s heart-pounding and side-splitting thriller/noir spoof, The 39 Steps!

The acting is quite simply some of the finest you will see in many seasons, and you may never pick your favorite.

Stuart Duncan, U.S. 1 Newspaper

http://tinyurl.com/lobm39m

Their portrayals exude sympathetic appreciation, and the chemistry is powerful among the sisters and between each of them and the other characters in the play — exciting and gratifying to watch.

Inside PST: Graphics Designer Paul Batterman

Hello everyone, Paul Batterman here. I’m the graphic designer and scenic artist here at PST, and I occasionally dabble in the art of ushering. I graduated from Princeton Day School in June, so I’m one of the youngest here, but all these older Princeton students (and graduates) aren’t too scary. In fact, they’re been downright wonderful in adopting me into the PST family. Back in high school, I was heavily involved with theater, doing scenic design, projection design, and scenic art. Come August I’ll be off to the University of Pennsylvania to study engineering and design, and where I hope to continue my involvement with theater to some degree.

This is my second summer at PST—last year I was a scenic artist and props intern, doing much of the same stuff I’m doing this year (except that the pay’s a little bit better this time around). My work usually consists of designing posters, advertisements, flyers, programs, and paper props. After helping print the aforementioned programs, I now believe I know my way around a jammed printer better than the average Princeton student. 

Enough about me, I’m only one member of this talented company. We’re midway through our production of Crimes of the Heart, and you can look forward to The 39 Steps, which premieres on July 18th. I’m especially excited to start working on the photo shoot and subsequent poster for Steps, both of which look to be quite fun. Look for my current (and future) work in windows around Princeton!

So many smiles at the Young Artist’s Improv Workshop on Friday.  Can’t wait for the next one, Foundations of Playwrighting!  Sign up by emailing princetonsummertheater@gmail.com

So many smiles at the Young Artist’s Improv Workshop on Friday. Can’t wait for the next one, Foundations of Playwrighting! Sign up by emailing princetonsummertheater@gmail.com

First Young Artist’s Workshop!   Maeve Brady teaches our campers some fundamentals of improv.

First Young Artist’s Workshop! Maeve Brady teaches our campers some fundamentals of improv.

Two-headed dragon (Evan Thompson and Emma Watt) and gremlin jelly enthusiast Fidget (Pat Rounds) #howthumbelinafoundherwings

Two-headed dragon (Evan Thompson and Emma Watt) and gremlin jelly enthusiast Fidget (Pat Rounds) #howthumbelinafoundherwings